Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush talks to the media while visiting the Georgia Capitol, Thursday, March 19, 2015, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush talks to the media while visiting the Georgia Capitol, Thursday, March 19, 2015, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Outside Iowa: Could Jeb Bush, Sue Sylvester run the nation together?

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How does Iowa stack up with other states? How much does Washington affect the lives of Iowans? Every Tuesday, politics reporter Brent Griffiths takes a look at the Hawkeye State’s place in the nation, as relevant to recent news, with Outside Iowa. Politics reporter Rebecca Morin has a special edition of Outside Iowa today.

Normally I do not do Outside Iowa (holla at Bill Book), but this is a topic close to my heart: “Glee.” In the super-real city of Lima, Ohio, but the fictional world of “Glee,“ Jane Lynch’s Sue Sylvester somehow becomes vice president to none other than Jeb Bush, as depicted in the series finale, which aired March 20. The episode flashes between the present and five years into the future.

sue vp

I know, it’s like, “How come I didn’t hear about this?” Well, we all know “Glee” has gone downhill once Lea Michele’s character, Rachel Berry, along with her equally talented counterparts, graduated and went off to do her own thing, and of course, after the untimely death of Cory Monteith (RIP). But according to “Glee,” former Florida Gov. Bush won the 2016 election, along with his re-election in 2020. And Bush’s right-hand (wo)man was Sue Sylvester.

Also, in case anyone was wondering, during an interview with Fox News’ Geraldo Rivera in “Glee,” Sylvester announced on national television, just after Bush won re-election, that she would in fact run for president in 2024. (#Sylvester2024?)

But in all seriousness, does this actually mean anything in the real world, rather than just “Glee”?

Well, currently Bush is leading in many polls as the Republican candidate for the presidential nomination (except in Iowa, where former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee is leading by 1 percentage point over Bush and 2 over Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, according to a NBC/Marist Poll).

The one thing Bush has to worry about: former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. According to the polls, Rodham Clinton is leading in the majority of polls against Bush for president.

So I guess the only advice I have for Bush right now is: Don’t stop believing.

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