David Young

Rep. David Young speaks to The Daily Iowan inside his office at the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 12, 2015. (The Daily Iowan/Rebecca Morin)

Rep. David Young speaks to The Daily Iowan inside his office at the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 12, 2015. (The Daily Iowan/Rebecca Morin)

By Mitch McAndrew | mmcandrew@uiowa.edu

David Young is no stranger to Congress.

After almost two decades working on Capitol Hill, the first-term congressman’s 2014 election to the U.S. House of Representatives was not so much a career change as a promotion.

Young worked as chief of staff for former Kentucky Sen. Jim Bunning from 1998 to 2006, when he became longtime Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley’s chief of staff, where he stayed until his successful bid for Iowa’s third  congressional district seat in 2014.

David Young Age: 48 Hometown: Van Meter Education: Drake University Family: Young is unmarried and has no children.

David Young
Age: 48
Hometown: Van Meter
Education: Drake University
Family: Young is unmarried and has no children.

Young also knows the ropes of political campaigning. His first venture on the trail came in 1992 when he volunteered for the Bush-Quayle presidential campaign. Other highlights include working as a political designee for the Hawkeye Political Action Committee and managing Bunning’s U.S. Senate campaign in 2004.

But in an election year characterized by the rise of “outsider” candidates, Young’s opponents have worked to paint him as an out-of-touch Washington insider.

“He’s never held a job outside of Congress,” Andrew Mulvey, Jim Mowrer’s campaign manager, told The Daily Iowan in March.

Young says his experience working in Washington allows him to be a bridge builder that gets along with everybody.

“We’ve got the same goals— a more peaceful world, safer streets, better opportunity, strong economy— just different ways of getting there,” Young told The Daily Iowan in March.

The Van Meter native’s legislative goal during his first term in Congress has been to restore the balance of lawmaking power at the federal level.

Young is a co-sponsor of the REINS Act, a bill that would require regulations impacting the American economy by at least $100 per year on the economy to be approved by Congress.

“The rules and regulations that come out of any given administration, Republican or Democrat, have the same effect as law, really,” Young said. “But the policy-setting body should be for Congress.”

Young sits on the House Committee on Appropriations, and has been assigned to the Subcommittees on Agriculture, Homeland Security, Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development.