Hillary Clinton

 

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to a crowded gynmasium inside Lincoln High School in Des Moines on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016. Clinton touched on various subjects including renewable fuel, labor unions, minimum wage and equal pay. (The Daily Iowan/Brooklynn Kascel)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to a crowded gynmasium inside Lincoln High School in Des Moines on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016. Clinton touched on various subjects including renewable fuel, labor unions, minimum wage and equal pay. (The Daily Iowan/Brooklynn Kascel)

By Matthew Jack | matthewmjack@gmail.com

When Hillary Clinton became the first woman to win the nomination of a major political party, it became only the latest milestone in a career marked by a vertical trail of shattered glass ceilings.

After earning her law degree from Yale University, Clinton built her reputation as an advocate for women and children by becoming the first female partner of the esteemed Rose Law Firm, taking child advocacy cases pro bono; by co-founding the public policy organization Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families; and by becoming the first chair of the newly-founded American Bar Association’s Commission on Women in the Profession, which addressed gender bias in the legal profession.

As U.S. Senator for New York — the only first lady to hold elected office — she was tested in the first year of her first term by the September 11 attacks and the subsequent invasion of Iraq, which she voted for but characterized as a “mistake” by the outset of her 2016 presidential campaign.

Hillary Rodham Clinton Age: 68 Hometown: Park Ridge, Illinois Education: Bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College; Juris Doctor degree from Yale Law School Family: Husband, Bill, and one daughter, Chelsea

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Age: 68
Hometown: Park Ridge, Illinois
Education: Bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College; Juris Doctor degree from Yale Law School
Family: Husband, Bill, and one daughter, Chelsea

Since the Syrian Civil War began in 2011, over 14,000 Syrian refugees have been settled in the U.S., and Clinton has echoed international calls for the U.S. to accept greater numbers, saying she “would like to see us move from what is a good start” to increasing that number to 65,000. She also supported a comprehensive immigration reform bill that provided a path to citizenship for millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S.

In the race for the 2016 Democratic nomination, Clinton’s biggest rival was the underdog senator from Vermont, Bernie Sanders.

Sanders lost the Iowa caucuses to Clinton by a razor-thin margin of 0.3 percent in February, and by March was leading Clinton nationally among Democrats by 1 percent, according to a Bloomberg/Selzer poll.

But Sanders failed to win several key battleground states like California and Ohio, and Clinton emerged from the Democratic National Convention as the party’s nominee.

However, internal Clinton campaign e-mails published by the whistleblower outlet WikiLeaks revealed a pro-Clinton bias within the DNC, sparking outrage among Sanders’ supporters and prompting the resignation of DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

Clinton’s campaign took to heart the significant Democratic support behind Sanders’ ideas and published the most progressive platform in Democratic party history, adopting his calls for a federal minimum wage of $15.00 an hour and to break up banks big to fail.

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On her website, Clinton says she would expand the Affordable Care Act — known colloquially as Obamacare — and supports establishing a “public option.” She also pledges to “work with governors to expand Medicaid in every state,” and outlines a plan to reduce out-of-pocket health care costs.

While she has not released a list of potential nominees to fill the vacant Supreme Court seat, Clinton referred to President Obama’s nominee, Merrick Garland, as “a good choice,” according to White House spokesman Josh Earnest.

In the second presidential debate, Clinton said she wanted “a Supreme Court that will stick with a woman’s right to choose … that will stick with marriage equality,” and overturn the Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission decision which allowed unlimited donations from individuals and corporations to political “Super-PACs.”

“I want to thank Bernie Sanders,” Clinton said in her victory speech at the DNC. “And to all of your supporters here and around the country: I want you to know, I’ve heard you.”