Jill Stein

Green party presidential candidate Jill Stein delivers a stump speech to her supporters during a campaign stop at Humanist Hall in Oakland, Calif. on Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016. (AP Photo/D. Ross Cameron)

Green party presidential candidate Jill Stein delivers a stump speech to her supporters during a campaign stop at Humanist Hall in Oakland, Calif. on Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016. (AP Photo/D. Ross Cameron)

By Maria Curi | maria-curi@uiowa.edu

As a third party candidate, a theme of Jill Stein’s Green campaign has been highlighting what she said is a broken two-party system.

“People are told over and over don’t vote your values vote your fears but what we got was everything we were afraid of,” Stein said in a video featured on her website. “Forget the lesser evil, stand up and fight for the greater good.”

On the campaign trail, Stein stresses that in order to uphold a true democracy the voices of opposition parties must be heard in inclusive debates. A multitude of parties, Stein said, would make it harder for corporations to monetarily influence candidates and censor non-corporate points of view. 

Jill Stein Age: 66 Hometown: Highland Park, Illinois Education: Harvard Medical School Family: Husband, Richard; two sons

Jill Stein
Age: 66
Hometown: Highland Park, Illinois
Education: Harvard Medical School
Family: Husband, Richard; two sons

“If you can’t put your values into your vote then democracy is lost at sea. We have no moral compass and that’s exactly where we are right now,” Stein said. “People are hungering for more voices but the American political system excels at suppressing the voices of opposition.”

Entwined in many of Stein’s policy positions is the prioritization of preserving a clean environment. Stein is a practicing physician and in the 1990’s she noticed the links between human-produced toxicity in the environment and illness. Since then, Stein has been active in ensuring that the maintenance of a healthy environment is a legislative priority.

Holly Hart, Johnson County’s Green Party organizer, said she felt pride when at one event, volunteering for Jill Stein, North Dakota pipeline protestors approached her table and asked if they could help.

“In terms of water quality and sustainable agriculture, two things that are highly relevant to Iowans, Stein’s Green New Deal would be good for jobs and the environment,” Hart said in an interview with The Daily Iowan.

Hart said Stein’s proposal to guarantee tuition-free education from pre-school through university and abolish student debt should appeal to University of Iowa students and their families.

“It may sound controversial but if the government can bail out big banks then it should be able to bail out students too,” Hart said.